Perinatal Mental Health Speaker Series:
Promoting parents’ emotional wellbeing through education and collaboration

May is Maternal Mental Health Month!  Please join us for our free virtual speaker series on perinatal mental health featuring expert presenters in the field.  This series will be held every Wednesday in May. Click on the individual session to register.


Social Determinants of Grief: The Impact of Black Infant Loss


Featured Speaker:
Stacy Scott, PhD, MPA

Understanding African American grief requires taking a long look at the historical and contemporary experiences around the issues of death. But troublingly, there is very little research conducted on Black grief and its connection to racism and the social injustices connected to it. Understanding the impact of systemic racism and its influence on how a person reacts to loss sets the stage for addressing how best to support communities that are disproportionately affected by infant death. This session offers insight on how some women of color deal with compounded loss and trauma. Participants gain additional knowledge on how to best serve communities of color affected by infant loss.

Stacy Scott, PhD, MPA: Dr. Scott has spent the past 30 years designing and implementing programs to address health disparities in under-resourced communities. In 2016, she founded the Global Infant Safe Sleep Center, an organization with a mission to empower the world’s communities to achieve equity in infant survival. She is also the executive director of Baby’s 1st Network and is a senior project director and equity lead at NICHQ.  Recognizing the importance of being inclusive and striving for health equity, Dr. Scott leads NICHQ’s anti-racism and social justice work and serves as a champion of positive equitable change. Serving on several projects one being NAPPSS-IIN project that aims to make infant safe sleep and breastfeeding a national norm, focusing on operating under an equity Framework. This session was recorded on May 5, 2021.

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Addressing Mental Health Problems of Asian American Young Women

Featured Speaker:
Hyeouk Chris Hahm, PhD, LCSW

This informative presentation by Dr. Hyeouk Chris Hahm explores depression and suicide related behaviors amount Asian American young women.  Dr. Hahm outlines the risk factors, share the theoretical underpinning of these issues,  and highlight evidence-based interventions to treat mental health problems among Asian American women.

Dr. Hahm is the first Asian American who was promoted to full professor at BU School of Social Work.  Through her groundbreaking research, she is dedicated to reducing health disparities among Asian American populations with a particular emphasis on building empirical evidence of health risk behaviors   Funded by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) grants, she has developed and tested theoretical framework that explains suicide behaviors among Asian American women. The culturally grounded interventions she has developed including AWARE (Asian American Women’s Actions in Resilience and Empowerment) and Youth AWARE, which have been implemented in colleges and high schools. She has also received the research mentor award at Boston University and the Innovator’s award from Asian Women for Health. This session was recorded on May 12, 2021.

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Perinatal Mental Health & Trauma in the Latinx Community

Featured Speaker:
Adriana Alejandre, LMFT

A professional education session by Adriana Alejandre, LMFT focused on trauma-informed care from a mental health perspective when working with birthing people within the Latinx community. In this hour session, we discuss the impact on perinatal mental health as it relates to culture, barriers, and history of the medical model that validates fear by the community. Also, we talk about strategies and tools, along with a Q&A.

Adriana Alejandre is a Trauma Psychotherapist and Speaker from Los Angeles, California. She specializes in adults who struggle with PTSD and severe traumas at her own private practice. She has done disaster relief work for Hurricane Harvey and the Las Vegas shooting survivors. Adriana’s expertise has been featured in LA Times, Telemundo, USA Today, the New York Times and Buzzfeed, among many others. Adriana is the founder of Latinx Therapy, a national directory of Latinx Therapists and global, bilingual podcast that provides education to combat the stigma of mental health on the ground, and in the digital spaces. In 2019, she won Hispanizice’s TECLA award for Best Social Good Content award, and in 2020 she was one of 5 Latinx influencers chosen for the #YoSoy Instagram and Hispanic Heritage Foundation award. Adriana’s mission is to create spaces to spark dialogue about mental health struggles and strengths in the Latinx community. This session was recorded on May 19, 2021.

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Risk, Resilience, and Depression in Fathers from Diverse Backgrounds

Fathers are important members of the family unit. However, research studies in the fields of family psychology and maternal and child health have historically not included dads, especially those from low-income and diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. While this is slowly beginning to change, many research gaps still exist regarding paternal health and well-being. This talk will present research findings from the Community and Child Health Network (CCHN), a National Institute of Health-funded, community-based participatory research project that investigated racial/ethnic disparities in maternal and child health in 5 sites across the United States. This talk (a) describe how paternal depression negatively affects the father and family, (b) identify risk factors for depression in low-income Black and Latino fathers, (c) discuss resilience resources that may protect fathers from depression, (d) recommend practical solutions for improving paternal mental health and familial well-being.

Dr. Olajide N. Bamishigbin Jr., is a Nigerian-American health psychologist and professor of psychology at California State University, Long Beach. Born and raised in Miami, he received his BA in Psychology from the University of Miami and his PhD in Psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2017. His research on paternal depression has been published in peer-reviewed research outlets such as Social Science and Medicine, Frontiers in Psychiatry, and the American Journal of Men’s Health and featured on news outlets such as The Today Show and CNN. Dr. Bamishigbin has presented his research at conferences such as the Association for Psychological Science, the Western Psychological Association, and the Society of Behavioral Medicine. Dr. Bamishigbin is also married to Dr. Jahneille Cunningham and has 2 sons Olajide III and Olakunle. This session was recorded on May 26, 2021.

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Target Audience
Obstetricians, Pediatricians, Nurses (perinatal), Advanced Practice Nurses, Certified Nurse Midwives, and Mental Health Providers.

Disclosure/Commercial Support
The planners and speaker do not have any conflicts of interest to report for this activity. There is no commercial support for this activity.

Successful Completion
To receive contact hours for this continuing education program, the registrant must sign-in for the webinar, attend the entire presentation and complete and submit an on-line evaluation. A certificate of completion will be sent via email within one week of the program.

Continuing Nursing Education Contact Hours
Each session in this series has been awarded 1.0 contact hours.

The Partnership for Maternal and Child Health of Northern New Jersey is an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the New Jersey State Nurses Association, an accredited approver, by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. #P194-2/2023

Approval status does not imply endorsement by the Partnership for Maternal and Child Health of Northern New Jersey, NJSNA or by ANCC of any commercial products discussed/displayed in conjunction with the educational activity.

Questions?  Contact Irina Ventura at 973-268-2280 x155 or iventura@partnershipmch.org

This program is supported by a grant from the New Jersey Department of Health.

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